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Classification of strains of Fusarium oxysporum on the basis of vegetative compatibility

Publication: Canadian Journal of Botany
February 1985

Abstract

Twenty-one strains of Fusarium oxysporum were classified on the basis of vegetative compatibility or the ability to form hetcrokaryons. Heterokaryon formation was demonstrated by pairing mutants that were unable to reduce nitrate. These "nit mutants" could be recovered without mutagen treatment from selective media containing KClO3. On Czapek's minimal medium the nit mutants had a radial growth rate like that of wild type, but their colonies were very thin. Two genetically different nit mutants were recovered in each of the 21 strains and paired in all combinations on minimal medium. Heterokaryon formation was indicated by dense growth where the two mutant colonies touched. As a result, 16 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) were defined such that only strains in the same VCG were vegetatively compatible. In no case was a strain assignable to more than one VCG. There was some evidence for a correlation between VCG and forma specialis. An evolutionary model to explain this correlation is proposed. Vegetative compatibility may be a fast and easy way to distinguish pathotypes of F. oxysporum.

Résumé

Vingt et une souches de Fusarium oxysporum ont été classifiées sur la base de la compatibilité végétative, ou sur la capacité de former des hétérocaryons. La formation d'hétérocaryons a été démontrée en appariant des mutants qui sont incapables de réduire les nitrates. Ces mutants "nit" peuvent être retrouvés sans traitement mutagène à partir de milieux sélectifs contenant du KClO3. Sur milieu de Czapek minimal, les mutants nit ont un taux de croissance radiale semblable à celui des souches sauvages mais les colonies sont très minces. Pour chacune des 21 souches, deux mutants nit génétiquement différents ont été récupérés et appariés dans toutes les combinaisons possibles sur milieu minimal. La formation d'hétérocaryons s'est révélée par une croissance plus dense là où les colonies des deux mutants se rencontrent. Ainsi, 16 groupes de compatibilité végétative (VCGs) ont été définis de sorte que seulement les souches du même VCG sont végétativement compatibles. En aucun cas une même souche n'a pu être attribuée à plus d'un VCG. Il semble y avoir une certaine corrélation entre le VCG et la forma speeialis. L'auteur propose un modèle évolutif pour expliquer cette corrélation. La compatibilité végétative pourrait être un moyen rapide et facile pour distinguer les pathotypes du F. oxysporum. [Traduit par le journal]

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cover image Canadian Journal of Botany
Canadian Journal of Botany
Volume 63Number 2February 1985
Pages: 179 - 183

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Version of record online: 31 January 2011

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76. Endophytic association of the pine pathogen Fusarium circinatum with corn ( Zea mays )
77.
78.
79.
80. Multilocus Analysis Using Putative Fungal Effectors to Describe a Population of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugar Beet
81. New evidence of intra-race diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. dianthi populations based on Vegetative Compatibility Groups
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90. Race Differentiation in F usarium oxysporum f.sp. chrysanthemi
91. Cross Pathogenicity and Vegetative Compatibility of Fusarium oxysporum Isolated from Sugar Beet
92. Vegetative Compatibility, Pathogenicity and Virulence Diversity of F usarium oxysporum f. sp.  melongenae Recovered from Eggplant
93. Genetic variability among breeding lines and cultivars of eggplant against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melongenae from Turkey
94. Phylogenetic relationships of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis in Iran
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96. Pathogenicity, vegetative compatibility and RAPD analysis of Fusarium oxysporum isolates from tobacco fields in Extremadura
97. Breeding melon for resistance to Fusarium wilt: recent developments
98. Fusarium Species Isolated from Common Weeds in Eggplant Fields and Symptomless Hosts of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melongenae in Turkey
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132. Race 3, a New and Highly Virulent Race of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum Causing Fusarium Wilt in Watermelon
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148. Recent developments in the molecular discrimination of formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum
149. Screenhouse and Field Persistence of Nonpathogenic Endophytic Fusarium oxysporum in Musa Tissue Culture Plants
150. Fungi associated with root rot and collapse of melon in Italy
151. Reassessment of Vegetative Compatibility of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa Using Nitrate-Nonutilizing Mutants
152. Vegetative Hyphal Fusion Is Not Essential for Plant Infection by Fusarium oxysporum
153. Vegetative Compatibility Among Fusarium Oxysporum Isolates from Bitter Gourd and Bottle Gourd in the Philippines
154. Vegetative compatibility and molecular characterization of Fusarium graminearum isolates from the State of Paraná, Brazil
155. Comparison of Colletotrichum orbiculare and Several Allied Colletotrichum spp. for mtDNA RFLPs, Intron RFLP and Sequence Variation, Vegetative Compatibility, and Host Specificity
156. A robust identification and detection assay to discriminate the cucumber pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum and f. sp. radicis-cucumerinum
157. In vitro assessment of the inhibition of humic substances on the growth of two strains of Fusarium oxysporum
158. Caracterización molecular y genética de aislamientos patógenos de Pyricularia grisea del trigo (Triticum aestivum Lam.) y triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) en la Provincia de Paraná, Brasil
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160. Characterization of a Regional Population of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum by Race, Cross Pathogenicity, and Vegetative Compatibility
161. Characterization of biotin-autotrophic isolates derived from naturally occurring auxotrophic race 2 isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae
162. Cloning and characterization of Fpmtr1 , an amino acid transporter gene of Fusarium proliferatum ( Gibberella intermedia )
163. Pathogenicity and diversity of vegetative compatibility of Fusarium verticillioides
164. Analysis of Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum from Eruca vesicaria and Diplotaxis tenuifolia
165. Clarification of the Etiology of Glomerella Leaf Spot and Bitter Rot of Apple Caused by Colletotrichum spp. Based on Morphology and Genetic, Molecular, and Pathogenicity Tests
166. A defect in nir1 , a nirA ‐like transcription factor, confers morphological abnormalities and loss of pathogenicity in Colletotrichum acutatum
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168. Potential diversity in vegetative compatibility groupings in the California population of Gibberella circinata
169. Fusarium Wilt of Banana Is Caused by Several Pathogens Referred to as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense
170. References
171. Reaction to Three Races of Fusarium Wilt in the Phaseolus vulgaris Core Collection
172. Genetic variation in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense isolates based on random amplified polymorphic DNA and intergenic spacer
173. Race Distribution, Vegetative Compatibility and Pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Isolates in Greece
174. The application of high-throughput AFLP's in assessing genetic diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense
175. Vascular wilt of basil in Australia
176. Mapping the I-3 gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato: application of an I-3 marker in tomato improvement and progress towards the cloning of I-3
177. Panama Disease: An Old Nemesis Rears its Ugly: Head Part 2. The Cavendish Era and Beyond
178. Phylogenetic relationships between the lettuce root rot pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae races 1, 2, and 3 based on the sequence of the intergenic spacer region of its ribosomal DNA
179. Cross‐pathogenicity between Formae Speciales of Fusarium oxysporum , the Pathogens of Cucumber and Melon
180. Three evolutionary lineages of tomato wilt pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, based on sequences of IGS, MAT1, and pg1, are each composed of isolates of a single mating type and a single or closely related vegetative compatibility group
181. Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis‐cucumerinum attacking melon under natural conditions in Greece
182. Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lactucae from Lettuce
183. Vegetative Compatibility Groups in Cercospora kikuchii , the Causal Agent of Cercospora Leaf Blight and Purple Seed Stain in Soybean
184. Diversity and differentiation in two populations of Gibberella circinata in South Africa
185. Comparison of Colletotrichum orbiculare and several allied Colletotrichum species for mTDNA RFLPs, vegetative compatibility and pathogenicity on cucurbit differentials
186. Induced resistance to Fusarial wilt of banana by menadione sodium bisulphite treatments
187. Population Diversity within Isolates of Colletotrichum spp. Causing Glomerella Leaf Spot and Bitter Rot of Apples in Three Orchards in North Carolina
188. Suppression of Fusarium Wilt of Watermelon by Soil Amendment with Hairy Vetch
189. Genetic Diversity of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa Isolates from Turfgrasses from Various Regions in North America
190. Characterization of Iranian Isolates of Fusarium oxysporum on the Basis of RAPD Analysis, Virulence and Vegetative Compatibility
191. Quantification of Root and Stem Colonization of Watermelon by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum and Its Use in Evaluating Resistance
192. A rapid molecular method for differentiating two special forms (lycopersici and radicis-lycopersici) of Fusarium oxysporum
193. Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum Isolates Obtained from Cucumber in China by Pathogenicity, VCG, and RAPD
194. Genetic Diversity of Pathogenic and Nonpathogenic Populations of Fusarium oxysporum Isolated from Carnation Fields in Argentina
195. Vegetative compatibility groups in indigenous and mass-released strains of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: likelihood of recombination in the field
196. Barrage Zone Formation Between Vegetatively Incompatible Fusarium graminearum ( Gibberella zeae ) Isolates
197. Vegetative Compatibility Grouping of the Fusarium Wilt Pathogen of Paris Daisy ( Argyranthemum frutescens L.)
198. Isozyme Analysis and Soluble Mycelial Protein Pattern in Iranian Isolates of Several formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum
199. Fusarium wilt of basil in Greece: Foliar infection and cultivar evaluation for resistance
200. Genomics of Phytopathogenic Fusarium
201. Genetic diversity of the entomopathogenVerticillium lecanii on the basis of vegetative compatibility
202. Use of a Nitrate-Nonutilizing Mutant and Selective Media to Examine Population Dynamics of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae in Soil
203. Fusarium oxysporum : exploring the molecular arsenal of a vascular wilt fungus
204. Seed treatment prevents vertical transmission ofFusarium moniliforme, making a significant contribution to disease control
205. Effect of Menadione Sodium Bisulfite, an Inducer of Plant Defenses, on the Dynamic of Banana Phytoalexin Accumulation during Pathogenesis
206. Origin of Race 3 of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici at a Single Site in California
207. Vegetative Compatibility and Pathogenicity of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. Isolates from Olive in Israel
208. Characterization of Verticillium dahliae Isolates and Wilt Epidemics of Pepper
209. Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum Isolates from Common Bean and Sugar Beet Using Pathogenicity Assays and Random‐amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers
210. On the independence of barrage formation and heterokaryon incompatibility in Neurospora crassa
211. Fusarium oxysporum and its biocontrol
212. A Utilitarian Approach to Fusarium Identification
213. Compatibilidade vegetativa de nit-mutantes de Fusarium solani patogênicos e não-patogênicos ao feijoeiro e à soja
214. Pathogenicity and Vegetative Compatibility of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. Isolates from Olive in Morocco
215. Pathogenicity and Vegetative Compatibility of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli in Greece
216. Vegetative Compatibility Groups in Colletotrichum coccodes , the Causal Agent of Black Dot on Potato
217. Effect of chloropicrin fumigation on microbial communities evaluated by community-level physiological profile and the resistance against fusarium wilt
218. Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae from Onion in Colorado
219. Distinguishing characteristics and vegetative compatibility of Colletotrichum kahawe in comparison with other related species from coffee
220. Genetic analysis of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum from tomato plants
221. Somatic incompatibility of Rosellinia necatrix on avocado plants in southern Spain
222. Genetic Variation Among Fusarium oxysporum Isolates Associated with Root Rot of Amaranthus hybridus in South Africa
223. Icebergs and species in populations of Fusarium
224. Vegetative compatibility groups within Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lini from Linum usitatissimum (flax) wilt nurseries in western Canada
225. Vegetative compatibility and heterokaryon stability in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis‐lycopersici from Italy
226. Vegetative Compatibility and Pathogenicity of Verticillium dahliae from Spearmint and Peppermint
227. Characterization of Pyricularia grisea in the United States Using Independent Genetic and Molecular Markers
228. Characterization of Colletotrichum acutatum Causing Anthracnose of Anemone ( Anemone coronaria L.)
229. Potential for outcrossing in an apparently asexual population of Fusarium circinatum , the causal agent of pitch canker disease
230. An initial assessment of genetic relationships among populations of Fusarium circinatum in different parts of the world
231. Vegetative Compatibility amongVerticillium dahliae Isolates from Watermelon in Greece
232. Genetic diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis *
233. Assessment of vegetative compatibility of Acremonium cucurbitacearum and Plectosphaerella cucumerina isolates from diseased melon plants*
234. Vegetative Compatibility Grouping of Colletotrichum kahawae in Kenya
235. Race Determination and Vegetative Compatibility Grouping of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis from South Africa
236. Genetic diversity among isolates of Fusariumoxysporum f.sp. canariensis
237. Current status of vegetative compatibility groups inFusarium oxysporum: Supplement (1999)
238. Host Range Specificity in Verticillium dahliae
239. RAPD-PCR polymorphism and vegetative compatibility group variation in Spanish isolates of Acremonium cucurbitacearum
240. How do Japanese isolates of Verticillium dahliae correspond with standardized VCG testers?
241. Vegetative compatibility grouping in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici from the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium and France
242. Population Genetic Analysis Corroborates Dispersal of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici from Florida to Europe
243. Genetic Diversity of Fusarium oxysporum Strains from Common Bean Fields in Spain
244. Vegetative compatibility in the entomopathogen Verticillium lecanii
245. Developments in Fungal Taxonomy
246. Effects of European and U.S. Strains of Fusarium spp. Pathogenic to Leafy Spurge on North American Grasses and Cultivated Species
247. Folyt1, a New Member of the hAT Family, Is Active in the Genome of the Plant Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum
248. Potential for Dispersal of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. erythroxyli by Infested Seed
249. Current status of vegetative compatibility groups in fusarium oxysporum
250. Vegetative compatibility relationships among weakly pathogenic isolates (pathotype E) of Verticillium dahliae
251. Biological and Molecular Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Divides Race 1 Isolates into Separate Virulence Groups
252. Genetic Diversity of Fusarium oxysporum Isolates from Cucumber: Differentiation by Pathogenicity, Vegetative Compatibility, and RAPD Fingerprinting
253. Population Structure of Ascomycetes and Deuteromycetes
254. Vegetative compatibility grouping in Verticillium nigrescens and V. tricorpus
255. Molecular differences distinguish clonal lineages within East African populations of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense
256. Vegetative compatibility groups within Verticillium dahliae isolates from different hosts in Greece
257. Hyaline mutants from Verticillium dahliae , an example of selection and characterization of strains for host–parasite interaction studies
258. New genetic markers for Botrytis cinerea (Botryotinia fuckeliana)
259. Characterization of Colletotrichum Species Responsible for Anthracnose Diseases of Various Fruits
260. Relationships Among Wilt-Inducing Isolates of Fusarium oxysporum from Sweetpotato and Tobacco
261. Vegetative compatibility of an isolate of Verticillium dahliae pathogenic to both tomato and pepper
262. Multiple evolutionary origins of the fungus causing Panama disease of banana: Concordant evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies
263. Heterokaryosis and vegetative incompatibility in Stagonospora nodorum
264. Intraspecific diversity in Paecilomyces fumosoroseus
265. Systematic Numbering of Vegetative Compatibility Groups in the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum
266. Assessment of vegetative compatibility of race-2 tomato wilt isolates of Verticillium dahliae in Japan
267. Characterization of Glomerella cingulata isolates from almond fruit using VCG, molecular, fungicide sensitivity and pathogenicity tests 1
268. Improved Medium for Selecting Nitrate-Nonutilizing ( nit ) Mutants of Verticillium dahliae
269. Molecular Diagnosis of Fusarium spp.
270. Variation Among Isolates of Fusarium Avenaceum from Different Hosts Determined by DNA Analyses and Vegetative Compatibility Groupings
271. Phenotypic characterization of natural populations of Fusarium oxysporum in relation to genotypic characterization
272. THE EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM
273. Sporulation of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici on Stem Surfaces of Tomato Plants and Aerial Dissemination of Inoculum
274. Characterization of Pathogenic Races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Causing Fusarium Wilt of Melon in New York
275. Identification of Colletotrichum Species Responsible for Anthracnose and Root Necrosis of Strawberry in Israel
276. Vegetative compatibility groups of Japanese isolates of Verticillium dahliae
277. Genetic Diversity in the Plant-Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum
278. Host specificity and vegetative compatibility of Dutch isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. asparagi
279. Speciation and Population Biology in Colletotrichum
280. Vegetative Compatibility Groups in Acremonium Cucurbitacearum
281. Genetic Variation Among Fusarium oxysporum Isolates from Sugar Beet as Determined by Vegetative Compatibility
282. Contributions of Population Genetics to Plant Disease Epidemiology and Management
283. Use of nitrate non-utilizing mutants to study vegetative incompatibility in Fusarium solani (Nectria haematococca), especially members of mating populations I, V and VI
284. Vegetative compatibility among isolates ofColletotrichum gloeosporioides from almond in Israel
285. Population structure of the pitch canker pathogen, Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. pini, in California
286. Characterisation ofFusarium oxysporum isolated from carnation in Australia based on pathogenicity, vegetative compatibility and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay
287. Fungal vegetative compatibility — Promises and Prospects
288. A rose bengal amended medium for selecting nitrate-metabolism mutants from fungi
289. Electrophoretic karyotype variation among pathotypes of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. dianthi
290. Identification of races of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. dianthi by DNA fingerprinting and vegetative compatibility 1
291. Development of in vitro identification techniques for special pathogenic forms of Fusarium oxysporum1
292. The transposable element impala, a fungal member of the Tc1-mariner superfamily
293. Differentiation ofVerticillium dahliae populations on the basis of vegetative compatibility and pathogenicity on cotton
294. Vegetative compatibility in populations of Fusarium oxysporum from wild carnation
295. Molecular characterization of races and vegetative compatibility groups in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum
296. Characterization of antagonistic and pathogenicFusarium oxysporum isolates by random amplification of polymorphic DNA
297. Additive action of partial heterokaryon incompatibility (partial-het) genes in Aspergillus nidulans
298. Occurrence of a retrotransposon-like sequence among different formae speciales and races of Fusarium oxysporum
299. Optimization of RAPD‐PCR Fingerprinting to Analyse Genetic Variation Within Populations of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense
300. EVOLUTION OF VEGETATIVE INCOMPATIBILITY IN FILAMENTOUS ASCOMYCETES. I. DETERMINISTIC MODELS
301. Characterization of the formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum causing wilts of cucurbits by DNA fingerprinting with nuclear repetitive DNA sequences
302. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, races and vegetative compatibility groups within a worldwide collection of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli
303. Examination of the relationships between vegetative compatibility groups and races in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. dianthi
304. Somatic incompatibility and nuclear reassortment in Heterobasidion annosum
305. Influence of Fusarium wilt toxin(s) on carnation cells
306. Comparative Studies of Cryptosporiopsis Curvispora and C. Perennans. II. Cytology and Vegetative Compatibility
307. The structure and interrelationship of fungal populations in native and cultivated soils
308. Classification of races by DNA polymorphism analysis and vegetative compatibility grouping in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. pisi
309. Vegetative compatibility and DNA polymorphisms in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis and their relationship to isolate virulence and origin
310. Obtaining mutants for protoplast fusion of gibberellin-forming itgibberella fujikuroi strains
311. Mitochondrial plasmids do not determine host range in crucifer‐infecting strains of Fusarium oxysporum
312. Physiological races and vegetative compatibility groups within Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli
313. Induced resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt invoked by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. dianthi
314. Induction of mutants of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici with altered virulence
315. Mitochondrial dna restriction fragment length polymorphisms infusarium oxysporum f. sp.niveum
316. Fusarium oxysporum Forms Heterokaryons with Fusarium redolens
317. Improved Media for Selecting Nitrate-Nonutilizing Mutants in Aspergillus Flavus
318. Virulence and Vegetative Compatibility of Dutch and Italian Isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii
319. Dynamics of Host-Parasite Interactions
320. Role of Rhizosphere Competence on Antagonistic Activity of Saprophytic Fusarium Spp.
321. Méthodes de diagnostic du bayoud du palmier dattier 1
322. Mycelial interactions inSclerotinia sclerotiorum
323. Phycomyces: Control of transpiration and the anemotropic reversal
324. Variability of mitochondrial DNA as an indicator of relationships between populations of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis
325. Parasexual recombination between vegetatively incompatible strains in Fusarium oxysporum
326. Five Genes Determining Intersterility in Heterobasidion Annosum
327. Progress in the study of Fusarium and some related genera
328. Vegetative incompatibility in Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides
329. Fusarial wilt of banana in Florida
330. Vegetative compatibility of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. dianthi from carnation in Israel
331. The elegans fusaria causing wilt disease of carnation. II. Distinction of vegetative compatibility groups
332. The mitochondrial genome of Fusarium oxysporum
333. Heterokaryon self-incompatibility in Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium moniliforme)
334. Implications of Genetic/Molecular Evidence with Respect to Virulence/Avirulence of Fungal Wilt Pathogens
335. Biology and Host-Parasite Relations of Fusarium Oxysporum F. Sp. Radicis-Lycopersici
336. Neurospora from natural populations: Toward the population biology of a haploid eukaryote
337. Cell wall permeability and its relationship to spore release in Achlya intricata
338. Auxotrophic mutants of Septoria nodorum isolated by direct screening and by selection for resistance to chlorate
339. Recombinant DNA Research in Phytopathogenic Fungi
340. Fusarium Oxysporum, a Pathogen of Many Plant Species
341.
342. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Fungi
343. Population ofAspergillus flavus on Pistachio Buds and Flowers

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